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Brian uses a variety of papers, some handmade, including a favourite Nepalese paper on which there can be up to 8 layers of pastel, highlighting any raised texture as well as scratchmarking to reveal shapes, symbols and underlying colour. The handmade paper is often used as a collage on top of another, maybe smoother paper, giving contrasting, broader colour fields. Sometimes, his work is hard edged and more symmetrical in many aspects, although still concerned with absolutes and ‘trying to make something out of nothing’.

'A Walk through the Conifers' was created as Brian's means of coming to terms with his unease at walking through the conifer plantations on Bodmin Moor; this was then followed by more expressive work as shown in the recent nocturnal cloudscapes, 'Stars over Bodmin Moor I and II'. More wonderful cloud formations inspired the two 'Red Boat & Stormy Clouds' works, while 'Red Boat & Stormy Seas' was created as a follow-on to the welcome gift picture Brian gave to Juno, his latest Granddaughter.

The image ‘Norfolk Church – High Summer I was inspired by a holiday in Norfolk: the church depicted is St Andrew’s at Little Snoring in north Norfolk, a lovely flint built church with a tower separate from the main building.

At times, he uses gold and other metallic leaf, pastel and pencil to create simple contemplative images and this is shown in his series inspired by the Burren country in County Clare, Ireland, seen on a spring time visit. Capturing the essence of hidden rare flora in the Burren, he has covered many areas of gold leaf within the images with scratched drawn flowers. A fusion of sea and land is apparent in these works, as is a feeling of spiritual ascension, notably in “Burren Eventide III”, the last of the series.

At other times, he is drawn to using saturated colours, also with various metallic leaf such as a range of golds and palladium (which gives a non-tarnishing silver) as in "Silver Rock II".